What's New

23.04.2018

【Speakers' Series】"What's in a Name?" - Mr Tsim Tak Lung

Mr Tsim went to Sing Yin Secondary School to deliver a speech "What's in a Name?". He talked about the pronounciation one can learn just from names. He also played a game with almost 300 students.

05.12.2017

Speakers Series

The Project Citizens Foundation is launching a Speakers Series. It will run from 2018-2019.

17.06.2017

Project Citizens Forum Hong Kong 2047 - Quo Vadis? Introductory Remarks by Mrs. Anson Chan

Carrie Lam and the incoming Administration cannot afford simply to put re-opening of the issue of constitutional reform on the back burner.  The nettle must be grasped, or the current downward spiral in our system of governance will continue. Mrs Lam is well qualified to lead this task and, if she chooses to move forward, she can count on the whole-hearted support of those of us in the pro-democracy camp who have devoted so much time and effort over the past years to find the right path to universal suffrage and ensure that our CE and all members of the Legislative Council enjoy a genuine mandate to govern.

26.11.2016

Project Citizens Foundation Forum Governance in Hong Kong: Are the Pillars Crumbling? Speech by the Rt. Hon. Lord Patten of Barnes CH

One of the many pleasant lessons that I learned during the five years that I lived in Hong Kong – the happiest years of my life - was the ubiquitous relevance and wisdom of Confucius.    I had not read the Analects before I came here, aged almost fifty, in 1992.   That was worse than a mistake, it was a shame.  Since then, I have turned back to the Analects again and again.   They contain sound wisdom and moral counsel.

I want to begin today with an exchange with the Master that goes right to the heart of the issue of good governance.

26.11.2016

Project Citizens Foundation Forum "Governance in Hong Kong: Are the Pillars Crumbling?" (26 November 2016) Speech by Prof. Peter Mathieson

A view from the University Sector, including International Comparisons

Whenever I get the opportunity, I try to encourage the Hong Kong Government to value and cherish its universities, not to feel threatened by them or concerned about their role in society. Hong Kong has five universities in the world’s top 200 and three in the top 80. A concentration of excellence per head of population which is unsurpassed anywhere else in Asia and as Lord Patten said in most other parts of the world. Anyone that cares about Hong Kong should take pride in that fact and not do anything to put it at risk.

26.11.2016

Project Citizens Foundation Forum "Governance in Hong Kong: Are the Pillars Crumbling?" (26 November 2016) Speech by Ms. Audrey Eu, SC, JP

The legislature and the separation of powers

​Lord Patten started with Confucius and I would like to follow with another Chinese philosopher Lao Zi (老子).    He said governing a big country is like cooking a small fish (治大國如烹小鮮).   Those of you who like steamed fish Chinese style will understand exactly what is meant.  The fire has to be just right, seasoning light, timing perfect and your hands gentle.   If you meddle too much with a small fish, you make a mess of it and may even end up with bones stuck in your throat, a most unpleasant if not dangerous experience. 

26.11.2016

Project Citizens Foundation Forum Governance in Hong Kong: Are the Pillars Crumbling? Opening Remarks by Mrs. Anson Chan, GBM, GCMG, CBE, JP

Hong Kong has played a key role in supporting the rise of a peaceful and prosperous China.  We will continue to do so, provided ‘one country, two systems’ is faithfully honoured and Hong Kong people are given the space they need to maintain their way of life and core values and to chart a course towards supporting the Motherland that is in their interests and not simply dictated by Beijing. 

There can be little doubt that our pillars of governance are being shaken.  If we are to protect them from crumbling, we must all play our part in resisting the progressive erosion of the core values underpinning our system of governance.  As a proud alumna of the University of Hong Kong I am particularly concerned at the recent political interference in the governance of the University and the assault on its institutional autonomy.  I will be listening with particular interest to Professor Mathieson’s views in this regard.  

18.11.2016

Special Announcement

Project Citizens Foundation regrets to announce that Mr. Jasper Tsang Yok-sing is unable to participate in the public forum on “Governance in Hong Kong: Are the Pillars Crumbling?” to be held on 26th November 2016 at the Grand Ballroom, Shangri-la Hotel, Kowloon. The Foundation welcomes Ms. Audrey Eu, Former Legislative Councillor, as a speaker at the forum.

18.10.2016

"Directors in Dialogue – Polling and Elections in the United States and Hong Kong" and the workshop on Polling and Elections successfully held on 11 and 12 October 2016

Jointly organized by the Public Opinion Programme of the University of Hong Kong and Project Citizens Foundation, the seminar "Directors in Dialogue – Polling and Elections in the United States and Hong Kong" and the workshop on Polling and Elections have been successfully held on two consecutively days - 11 and 12 October 2016. Prof. John Della Volpe from the Institute of Politics from Harvard University vividly described the political attitude of the millennial generation and the latest Trump phenomenon in the United States. On the other hand, Dr. Robert Chung pointed out the interactive relationship between the polls and political choices in reality, and how it affected the result of the recent LegCo Election in Hong Kong. Lastly, Prof. John Della Volpe shared his insights on how to make use of social media tools to enhance the election campaigning strategy, which would definitely play a very important role in the future elections.

16.08.2016

Public Forum: Assault on the ICAC and the Rule of Law? - "The Evolving ICAC" (Mr Bertrand de Speville)

The words ‘subject to the orders and control of the Chief Executive’ in S.5(1) could be deleted. Furthermore, the words ‘free from any interference’ in BL 63 (which deals with criminal prosecutions by the Department of Justice) might be added so that s.5(1) would read: ‘The Commissioner shall be responsible for the direction and administration of the Commission, free from any interference.’

In consequence, s.5(2) would be amended by deleting the words ‘other than the Chief Executive’ so that it would read: ‘The Commissioner shall not be subject to the direction or control of any person.’